“Who once was settled here, to him this is his homeland,” thus the Roman historian Tacitus quotes the Germanic Ubii.

Indeed, during the last about 2,000 years, people of numerous nationalities have come to the Rhine: Celts, Teutons, Romans, Frenchmen, Prussians, just to mention some of them. Therefore, the history of the Seven Mountains in the Rhineland is also a bit German and European history.

In the Roman Era, the Rhine was the border between the Roman Empire and the free Germania. In the Middle Ages, the front between regional powers, the Archbishopric of Cologne and The Duchies of Sayn and Berg, went right through the Seven Mountains. In the early modern times, the Prussian Kings again and again claimed the Duchy of Berg. Then, in the French Era, the Rhine again became the border, and the Duchy of Berg became a French model state with Napoleon at the top!

In 1815 began then the long time the “Prussian Rhineland”. As citizens of the State of Prussia, the Rhinelanders lived to see the establishment of the German Empire, the First World War and the Weimar Republic, when there were efforts to create a “Rhenish Republic”. Finally, death and destruction in the Second World War, the new start with the Petersberg Agreement and the today’s federal city of Bonn.